Plato was into inventio, too.  He viewed this first canon of rhetoric as a distinguishing feature that separated serious rhetoric from the foolishness of sophistry.

Plato was into inventio, too. He viewed this first canon of rhetoric as a distinguishing feature that separated serious rhetoric from the foolishness of sophistry.

Regular visitors to this blogging place (rare as they be!) might observe the name change: Now doing business under the title Inventio, the classical rhetorical term for invention. Inventio to the classical Greeks and Romans referred to the process of discovery, or invention, of persuasive arguments and ideas in rhetorical presentations.

The term has persisted in neo-classical theory as the pre-writing or discovery phase of the writing process. In that sense, I find the term fitting as a title for this blog, because I rarely publish fully developed and polished arguments. Rather, the posts typically play with ways of putting words down, sometimes tip-toing in the shallows of deep discourse but rarely wading too far out. The site provides a place for recreational reflection, a place to chronicle life’s trivial or sentimental moments, and above all, a collection of memoirs that my progeny can laugh and cry over after I finish this earthly soujourn. (Like Shakespeare’s “Shall I Compare Thee” concludes in the final couplet, “So long as men can breath or eyes can see, / So long lives this [blog], and this gives life to [me]. HaHa.

So inventio is a good name. A better name. And other than the name change, all the rest remains the same.

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