Who said “Vacation gives a morale boost?” That doesn’t work for me. This vacation ending today causes my morale to drag and droop at the thought of returning to work tomorrow. I have been blissfully carefree and happy for the past eight days. Thinking about tomorrow and returning to the office, my spirit groans.

Work, yes, a four-letter word, especially when associated with administration and dealing with crises and problems emanating from the shortcomings, errors, and incompetencies of subordinates and clients.

The Great Plains of America surrounds this scenic reservoir in central Kansas where we hiked and jogged last week.

The Great Plains of America surrounds this scenic reservoir in central Kansas where we hiked and jogged last week.

On the other hand, I agree with the premise I posted in this blog several years ago at the end of a memorable summer vacation: “Vacation is the natural state of man.”

That ideal is biblical, too, because work resulted from the curse of Adam’s and Eve’s foolishness. In the beginning, Eden was more perfect than the most glorious Gulf beach or Rocky Mountain height.

Facing the office tomorrow will be extra-hard because I know I’ve reached the retirement bar. So, may this post document the record at the beginning of the final 12 months of public work that begins in a few weeks: The only incentive to keep on for another 12 months is the retirement system’s DROP deferment plan. If not for DROP and the incentive of a healthy nest-egg as a service reward from the State, I’d bale out of this insanity tomorrow and go on perpetual vacation. The next 12 months cannot pass quickly enough!

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